Author: afehomeschoolers

Affirming the Black Child

Affirming the Black Child

Note: This is a list in progress.  I am kind and I deserve kindness in return. I am capable of anything I put my mind to. No one is allowed to steal my joy. I take responsibility of my mistakes without shame. I am beautiful 

Don’t Quit Homeschooling in February!

Don’t Quit Homeschooling in February!

In the last 9 years, I’ve come to know that homeschooling has a VERY cyclical schedule, especially if you’re in your first year or two. February is quitting time. It just is. That’s when everyone has had enough and sits down to count their failures 

How Television Teaches Us Science

How Television Teaches Us Science

Warning: Spoilers included if you haven’t seen the show.

Recently we’ve gotten into watching Black Lightning on Netflix, in order to start from the beginning before catching the latest season. After Anissa and Jefferson’s big reveal, The Kidd and I had a whole discussion on the way genes work and why there was NOT a 50/50 chance that each of the girls could’ve been born with powers.

Enter the Punnett Square, ratios and probability, dominant genes, and how this “probably” doesn’t apply to the X-Men because of random mutations.

Black Lightning has also led to discussions on why Black people with albinism are still Black, the historical exploitation of Black bodies in the medical field, why our family refuses vaccines, gang violence and the effects of poverty on our communities, the school to prison pipeline, and so much more.

Basically, it’s FAR MORE than a superhero show.

What shows or movies have you found that have been surprisingly educational?

The Monday Mix-Up

The Monday Mix-Up

Mondays are rough for us sometimes. The kids get my full attention on weekends, so when I have to turn that attention back to my computer on Monday morning to get back to work, the littles sometimes melt down. I’ve been rearranging my schedule a 

What You Need to Know About Deschooling

What You Need to Know About Deschooling

We need to talk about this because it’s important. Not only to your entire family’s mental health, but to your ultimate success as a homeschooler. Deschooling allows everyone the time to decompress from all prior educational settings, gives parents a chance to watch and observe 

Gameschooling 101

Gameschooling 101

Why do I homeschool?

Because there’s no way the above would be considered “curriculum” in a public school classroom. My 5yo doesn’t need a stack of work books (though we have a few and she enjoys them), she needs to play and create.

Have you considered “gameschooling” or incorporating it into your days?

It’s a thing!

Children often learn concepts faster when they’re playing a game, so this way of home learning — or supplementing — can be great for nailing down frustrating concepts. Children learn faster and retain more when things are relevant to them. If something doesn’t seem fun or important, they will have a harder time learning.

There are games for literally EVERY subject. Like these two games The Kidd and I have been playing for Biology — Pandemic and Virulence. Note how these also encompass being able to explain current events as they relate to virology and reinforce the reasons behind why we’re staying home and wearing masks when going out.

One of the girls’ favorite games is Sum Swamp. It’s a game of basic addition and subtraction for ages 5 and up. The great thing about playing games for school, is being able to adapt the game play for different abilities. When we play Sum Swamp, the girls use these colored wooden blocks as counters to help with the addition.

How often do you use board, card, video or other games in your home learning?

Looking for gameschooling support? Gameschooling (Teaching with Games) is a secular, safe and inclusive Facebook Group from Meg at Gameschool Academy that can help you find and discuss teaching with games.

Self-Directed Teens (A Day in the Life)

Self-Directed Teens (A Day in the Life)

“What does homeschooling older kids look like?” I hear this a lot, from worried parents of older elementary students, middle schoolers, and high school aged-kids. I get it; by the time your kids get to this point, the local homeschool group has cycled back to